Credit Advice

Why an original account and collection account both appear on your credit report for the same debt

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Credit Advice

Why an original account and collection account both appear on your credit report for the same debt

Dear Experian,

How can an item be on your credit twice, once under the original credit grantor and then under a collection agency? How does this affect the deletion date?

- NTK

Dear NTK,

Your credit report is a credit history. That history documents the life of a debt. As a result, it will show both the original lender and any subsequent collection accounts. However, they are not seen as two separate debts. Instead, a collection account is recognized as a continuation of the original debt.

The account you had with your bank should be listed as charged off. It could also show that it has been sold or transferred to a collection agency. Charged off, transferred or sold are considered a final status, essentially the same as closed. As a result, that account entry is no longer an active debt. However, it will continue to appear on your credit report to accurately reflect the account history.

The collection account now represents the active debt. Usually, a collection account indicates that it was purchased from or transferred from the original lender.

The collection agency may then sell the account to another collection agency. The first collection account then would be reported as sold or transferred, and the new, active collection account would be added to the credit history.

Because a collection account is treated as a continuation of the original debt, it will be deleted at the same time as the original account. The original account and subsequent collection accounts will be deleted seven years from the original delinquency date. The original delinquency date is the date of the first missed payment after which the account was never again current.

The collection agency is required by law to carry over that original delinquency date from the first account and report it to the credit reporting company. That ensures the collection account is deleted at the correct time.

Thanks for asking.

- The "Ask Experian" team

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