Credit Report & Scores » Report Advice » Collections » Can medical bills affect your credit report?

Can medical bills affect your credit report?

Your medical history is not part of a credit report, but past due medical debts can affect your credit reports and credit scores.

If a medical bill is left unpaid, the debt can be sold to a collection agency. The collection agency can then report the account to your credit reports, although the name of the doctor or medical office will not be revealed.

Once on your credit report, medical collections can remain for seven years from the original delinquency date and can hurt your credit scores, just like any other collection account.

Experian no longer displays medical collections on a credit report until they are 180 days past due. This grace period gives individuals with medical debt six months to resolve any insurance or billing issues and to make payment arrangements if necessary before the past due balance is reported.

After six months, the medical collections could become part of your credit report. However, the newest credit scoring formulas from FICO and VantageScore do not weigh medical collections as heavily as other types of collection accounts and may not count them at all after the collection is paid.

Check out the scope to hear answers to all the questions asked.

Do you have questions about credit?

Join our live video chat every Tuesday and Thursday at 3:00 p.m. ET on Periscope. Rod Griffin, Director of Public Education at Experian, is available to answer your questions live.
Scoped on: 2/20/2018