D.C., Southern States See Highest Rate of Late Auto Payments

Quick Answer

Experian analyzed auto loan delinquency data​​ to rank borrowers in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., with the percentage of auto loan accounts at least 30 days past due.

A man wearing a black suit has his hand to his face as he drives his car.

Missing a payment on an auto loan can carry with it more than the potential for a late fee. Your record of making payments on time is the most important factor in your credit scores, and just one delinquent payment can seriously impact your credit rating. Lenders check credit scores, such as a FICO® Score , to gauge your overall creditworthiness, and delinquent payments can make it harder to secure financing in the future.

Being late on an auto loan payment by a few days or weeks may result in a late fee, but the consequences get more severe once you hit the 30-day mark. When a payment is 30 days late, it gets reported to the credit bureaus as delinquent. A late payment stays on your credit report for seven years and can affect your scores the entire time it's there. However, the impact of a late payment becomes less severe as time passes and more on-time payments are made.

An auto loan uses the vehicle as collateral, and lenders are within their rights to claim it in the event of nonpayment. If a borrower continues to miss payments, the vehicle is at risk of repossession.

There are many personal and financial factors that contribute to why an individual may be delinquent on an auto loan, from changes in household income to uncertainties in a fluctuating job market. Predatory auto dealers are also a factor in some areas. Some dealers use aggressive tactics to pressure or mislead consumers into taking on high auto loans they have neither the credit rating nor income to afford. To protect consumers, the Federal Trade Commission targets predatory auto dealerships and lenders that use such tactics.

To better understand consumer auto loan delinquencies across the U.S., Experian analyzed auto delinquency data for the third quarter (Q3) of 2021. All 50 states—and Washington, D.C.—were ranked according to the percentage of consumer auto accounts ever 30 days past due, and ties were broken by the percentage of auto accounts at least 60 days past due.

Percent of Auto Financing Accounts Ever 30 or More Days Past Due

National Trends

There were higher-than-average rates of delinquency among states in the South and along the Atlantic coast. Explaining such a trend is complex, but one factor could be a state's poverty level. Several of the states shown to have some of the highest rates of delinquency—Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Texas and the Carolinas—all bear poverty levels above the national average.

Median household income is also among the lowest nationally in these states, and average FICO® Scores are on the lower end of the spectrum. Meanwhile, income and average FICO® Scores are higher in Northern and Midwestern regions of the country, where delinquency rates are comparatively lower.

According to Kelley Blue Book, average new car prices rose $6,220 in 2021, with the average price of a vehicle reaching $47,077 as of December of last year. As the cost of car ownership is pushed higher and higher, Experian has identified a trend of rising amounts of auto loan debt.

RankState, Avg. FICO® Score% of Auto Accounts Ever Late by Days Past Due (DPD)Average Monthly Payment
51Utah,
727 (13 points more than national average)
4.5% (30+ DPD)
2.5% (60+ DPD)
1.8% (90+ DPD)
$501 (lease)
$513 (loan)
50North Dakota,
733 (19 points more than national average)
4.6% (30+ DPD)
2.4% (60+ DPD)
1.6% (90+ DPD)
$518 (lease)
$582 (loan)
49South Dakota,
733 (19 points more than national average)
4.8% (30+ DPD)
2.5% (60+ DPD)
1.8% (90+ DPD)
$475 (lease)
$538 (loan)
48Idaho,
725 (11 points more than national average)
5.0% (30+ DPD)
2.6% (60+ DPD)
1.9% (90+ DPD)
$475 (lease)
$535 (loan)
47Wyoming,
722 (8 points more than national average)
5.0% (30+ DPD)
2.6% (60+ DPD)
1.8% (90+ DPD)
$505 (lease)
$636 (loan)
46Vermont,
736 (22 points more than national average)
5.1% (30+ DPD)
2.3% (60+ DPD)
1.5% (90+ DPD)
$449 (lease)
$511 (loan)
45Maine,
727 (13 points more than national average)
5.1% (30+ DPD)
2.3% (60+ DPD)
1.6% (90+ DPD)
$437 (lease)
$503 (loan)
44Iowa,
729 (15 points more than national average)
5.2% (30+ DPD)
2.7% (60+ DPD)
1.9% (90+ DPD)
$489 (lease)
$532 (loan)
43Minnesota,
742 (28 points more than national average)
5.2% (30+ DPD)
2.6% (60+ DPD)
1.8% (90+ DPD)
$480 (lease)
$515 (loan)
42New Hampshire,
734 (20 points more than national average)
5.4% (30+ DPD)
2.5% (60+ DPD)
1.6% (90+ DPD)
$439 (lease)
$500 (loan)
41Nebraska,
731 (17 points more than national average)
5.4% (30+ DPD)
2.8% (60+ DPD)
1.9% (90+ DPD)
$469 (lease)
$532 (loan)
40Wisconsin,
735 (21 points more than national average)
5.6% (30+ DPD)
2.9% (60+ DPD)
2.0% (90+ DPD)
$467 (lease)
$498 (loan)
39Montana,
730 (16 points more than national average)
5.6% (30+ DPD)
2.9% (60+ DPD)
2.0% (90+ DPD)
$476 (lease)
$547 (loan)
38Oregon,
731 (17 points more than national average)
5.7% (30+ DPD)
2.9% (60+ DPD)
2.0% (90+ DPD)
$451 (lease)
$499 (loan)
37Washington,
734 (20 points more than national average)
5.9% (30+ DPD)
3.0% (60+ DPD)
2.1% (90+ DPD)
$516 (lease)
$550 (loan)
36Kansas,
721 (7 points more than national average)
6.3% (30+ DPD)
3.3% (60+ DPD)
2.3% (90+ DPD)
$515 (lease)
$551 (loan)
35Alaska,
717 (3 points more than national average)
6.5% (30+ DPD)
3.0% (60+ DPD)
2.0% (90+ DPD)
$492 (lease)
$583 (loan)
34Colorado,
728 (14 points more than national average)
7.0% (30+ DPD)
3.6% (60+ DPD)
2.6% (90+ DPD)
$520 (lease)
$556 (loan)
33Pennsylvania,
724 (10 points more than national average)
7.4% (30+ DPD)
3.7% (60+ DPD)
2.6% (90+ DPD)
$471 (lease)
$505 (loan)
32Michigan,
719 (5 points more than national average)
7.6% (30+ DPD)
4.2% (60+ DPD)
3.2% (90+ DPD)
$447 (lease)
$480 (loan)
31Indiana,
712 (2 points less than national average)
7.6% (30+ DPD)
4.3% (60+ DPD)
3.2% (90+ DPD)
$484 (lease)
$519 (loan)
30Ohio,
715 (1 points more than national average)
8.1% (30+ DPD)
4.5% (60+ DPD)
3.3% (90+ DPD)
$453 (lease)
$500 (loan)
29Missouri,
711 (3 points less than national average)
8.1% (30+ DPD)
4.4% (60+ DPD)
3.2% (90+ DPD)
$526 (lease)
$532 (loan)
28Virginia,
721 (7 points more than national average)
8.2% (30+ DPD)
4.3% (60+ DPD)
3.0% (90+ DPD)
$541 (lease)
$547 (loan)
27West Virginia,
699 (15 points less than national average)
8.3% (30+ DPD)
4.4% (60+ DPD)
3.1% (90+ DPD)
$477 (lease)
$575 (loan)
26Arizona,
710 (4 points less than national average)
8.6% (30+ DPD)
4.9% (60+ DPD)
3.7% (90+ DPD)
$512 (lease)
$576 (loan)
25California,
721 (7 points more than national average)
8.7% (30+ DPD)
4.6% (60+ DPD)
3.3% (90+ DPD)
$567 (lease)
$572 (loan)
24Tennessee,
701 (13 points less than national average)
8.7% (30+ DPD)
4.8% (60+ DPD)
3.5% (90+ DPD)
$527 (lease)
$560 (loan)
23Oklahoma,
692 (22 points less than national average)
8.7% (30+ DPD)
4.9% (60+ DPD)
3.7% (90+ DPD)
$524 (lease)
$597 (loan)
22Massachusetts,
732 (18 points more than national average)
8.8% (30+ DPD)
4.0% (60+ DPD)
2.5% (90+ DPD)
$458 (lease)
$482 (loan)
21Illinois,
719 (5 points more than national average)
8.9% (30+ DPD)
4.8% (60+ DPD)
3.4% (90+ DPD)
$534 (lease)
$541 (loan)
20Rhode Island,
723 (9 points more than national average)
9.0% (30+ DPD)
4.5% (60+ DPD)
3.0% (90+ DPD)
$462 (lease)
$461 (loan)
19Florida,
707 (7 points less than national average)
9.0% (30+ DPD)
5.0% (60+ DPD)
3.6% (90+ DPD)
$549 (lease)
$553 (loan)
18Kentucky,
702 (12 points less than national average)
9.1% (30+ DPD)
5.2% (60+ DPD)
3.8% (90+ DPD)
$490 (lease)
$527 (loan)
17Connecticut,
726 (12 points more than national average)
9.1% (30+ DPD)
4.4% (60+ DPD)
2.9% (90+ DPD)
$514 (lease)
$495 (loan)
16Delaware,
714 (Equal to the national average)
9.2% (30+ DPD)
5.0% (60+ DPD)
3.6% (90+ DPD)
$474 (lease)
$533 (loan)
15New Jersey,
725 (11 points more than national average)
9.2% (30+ DPD)
4.5% (60+ DPD)
3.1% (90+ DPD)
$519 (lease)
$518 (loan)
14Arkansas,
694 (20 points less than national average)
9.4% (30+ DPD)
5.6% (60+ DPD)
4.2% (90+ DPD)
$383 (lease)
$607 (loan)
13Nevada,
701 (13 points less than national average)
9.5% (30+ DPD)
5.4% (60+ DPD)
3.9% (90+ DPD)
$565 (lease)
$582 (loan)
12New Mexico,
699 (15 points less than national average)
9.5% (30+ DPD)
5.3% (60+ DPD)
3.8% (90+ DPD)
$465 (lease)
$616 (loan)
11Texas,
692 (22 points less than national average)
10.1% (30+ DPD)
5.5% (60+ DPD)
4.0% (90+ DPD)
$578 (lease)
$662 (loan)
10New York,
722 (8 points more than national average)
10.1% (30+ DPD)
5.0% (60+ DPD)
3.5% (90+ DPD)
$507 (lease)
$517 (loan)
9Hawaii,
732 (18 points more than national average)
10.3% (30+ DPD)
5.2% (60+ DPD)
3.5% (90+ DPD)
$520 (lease)
$565 (loan)
8North Carolina,
707 (7 points less than national average)
10.3% (30+ DPD)
5.8% (60+ DPD)
4.1% (90+ DPD)
$493 (lease)
$541 (loan)
7South Carolina,
693 (21 points less than national average)
10.5% (30+ DPD)
5.9% (60+ DPD)
4.2% (90+ DPD)
$497 (lease)
$543 (loan)
6Maryland,
716 (2 points more than national average)
10.6% (30+ DPD)
5.7% (60+ DPD)
4.1% (90+ DPD)
$556 (lease)
$560 (loan)
5Alabama,
691 (23 points less than national average)
11.4% (30+ DPD)
6.7% (60+ DPD)
5.0% (90+ DPD)
$513 (lease)
$575 (loan)
4Georgia,
693 (21 points less than national average)
12.1% (30+ DPD)
6.8% (60+ DPD)
4.9% (90+ DPD)
$533 (lease)
$590 (loan)
3Louisiana,
689 (25 points less than national average)
12.8% (30+ DPD)
7.3% (60+ DPD)
5.1% (90+ DPD)
$566 (lease)
$627 (loan)
2Mississippi,
681 (33 points less than national average)
15.1% (30+ DPD)
8.7% (60+ DPD)
6.2% (90+ DPD)
$463 (lease)
$600 (loan)
1Washington, D.C.,
717 (3 points more than national average)
23.4% (30+ DPD)
14.7% (60+ DPD)
11.3% (90+ DPD)
$563 (lease)
$518 (loan)

The purpose of this question submission tool is to provide general education on credit reporting. The Ask Experian team cannot respond to each question individually. However, if your question is of interest to a wide audience of consumers, the Experian team may include it in a future post and may also share responses in its social media outreach. If you have a question, others likely have the same question, too. By sharing your questions and our answers, we can help others as well.

Personal credit report disputes cannot be submitted through Ask Experian. To dispute information in your personal credit report, simply follow the instructions provided with it. Your personal credit report includes appropriate contact information including a website address, toll-free telephone number and mailing address.

To submit a dispute online visit Experian's Dispute Center. If you have a current copy of your personal credit report, simply enter the report number where indicated, and follow the instructions provided. If you do not have a current personal report, Experian will provide a free copy when you submit the information requested. Additionally, you may obtain a free copy of your report once a week through December 31, 2022 at AnnualCreditReport.