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How Student Loans are Reported on Your Credit Report

Dear Experian,

I have an account number that was reported late for student loans. I did not realize the amount due had changed,  so I continued to send the old payment amount. Once I knew I was behind, I contacted the lender and told them how I planned to get caught up. I followed through with plan and am trying to get the negative information removed because it has ruined my good credit. Each part of the loan account was reported as delinquent separately, so now my report shows seven late payments, even though I only paid the wrong amount one time. This does not seem right.


Dear SJB,

When you apply for student loans, you actually receive a separate loan for each semester or enrollment period. Once you graduate, you may only make one payment every month, but each individual loan will appear on your credit report.

Because you only make one monthly payment towards the loans, missing one payment means the payment is missed for each of the individual loans, so each separate account listing on the report will show as late. As you can see, this makes it even more important to ensure that your student loan payment is never missed and that you double check the amount due each month.

Although you explained how you planned to bring the account payments current, you don’t indicate if the lender agreed to your plan or if they said they would make changes to your credit report as a result. You should have received a written agreement from the lender to document your agreement with them.

Even if the lender is unwilling to remove the delinquencies, the late payments will have less  negative effect on your credit as time passes. You can help your credit recover by continuing to make all payments on time going forward.

If you only had one instance of delinquency, and nothing else is late or carrying a high balance, your credit scores may rebound fairly quickly. If there are other issues in addition to the student loan payments it will take longer. Just how long depends on your unique credit history.

Thanks for asking.
The “Ask Experian” team

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