Credit Education » Credit Report Basics » My Credit Report

My Credit Report

Your personal credit report contains details about your financial behavior and identification information. This user-friendly report is sometimes called a credit file or a credit history. Experian® collects and organizes data about your credit history from your creditor’s and public records. We make your credit report available to current and prospective creditors, employers and others as permitted by law, which may speed up your ability to get credit. Getting a copy of your credit report makes it easy for you to understand what lenders see when they check your credit history.

View a Sample Experian Credit Report.

How can I get my Credit Report?

Under federal law you are entitled to a copy of your credit report every twelve months. To obtain a free credit report go to www.annualcreditreport.com. There, you can get your credit report from all three credit reporting agencies — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion — once every 12 months.

If you have been turned down for credit, employment or insurance you may qualify for a free report. Contact the company that denied you service and request the name and contact information of the credit bureau from whom they obtained your information. You can then contact this credit bureau within 60 days using the information provided to obtain your free credit report.

You can also get your free credit report with no credit card required directly from Experian.

How often is my Credit Report updated?

In general, creditors forward information to the credit reporting agencies monthly. The day of the month that each individual creditor sends updates varies. In other words, we might receive an update from creditor A on the first of every month and from creditor B on the 11th of every month, etc. This is why it’s important to have access to your credit report every day.

Do you have a problem on your credit report?

Inaccurate information on my Credit Report

Identity Theft and Credit Fraud

  • Add a Security Freeze – A security freeze will prevent Experian from releasing your credit information without your express authorization.
  • Add a Credit Fraud Alert – If you suspect someone is committing identity theft against you, you may want to add a fraud alert to your credit file.

Credit Application Declined

  • Denied Credit? – Were you denied credit or have you received adverse action based on information in an Experian credit report?
Review Your Free Experian Credit Report Today

Good credit begins with knowing where your credit is today. Get started with your free Experian Credit Report, updated every 30 days on sign in. No credit card required.

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Quiz: Your Holiday Spending Profile

Are you king of the holiday budget, or are you more of a true Scrooge? Test your knowledge of holiday spending and ID theft here.