Oct
20
2010

Saying Hello Right Away and Monthly, But Never In Between

It’s no secret that the sooner you contact someone who has indicated their interest in your products or services, the likelier you are to get their business. After all, ‘recency’ has always been a key marketing indicator of where the next potential dollars might come from. But did you realize that if you don’t get that first email out to them right away, it may be better to hold off for a few weeks rather than a few days?

This is one of the more unusual findings in Experian CheetahMail’s latest report, The welcome email report: Benchmark data and analysis for engaging new subscribers through email marketing.

Clearly, real-time messaging gives you a huge competitive advantage. But what if for some reason real-time welcome messages are not an option for your business?

It should come as no surprise that real-time triggered emails outperform bulk welcome messages that operate on some sort of delay. In today’s instant-access consumer culture, those who reach out to you are looking for instant response. Clearly, real-time triggered welcome messages fulfill this need, earning over 10x higher transaction rates and 11x revenue per email than delayed bulk welcome messages.

Clearly, real-time messaging gives you a huge competitive advantage. But what if for some reason real-time welcome messages are not an option for your business? In this scenario, the common assumption would be that you should send out bulk welcome messages as soon as you can get to them. However, data from our report shows that this assumption is not necessarily true.

As it turns out, if you can’t get that first welcome message out the door on the same day as the initial registration, you might want to wait several weeks before sending out the first email. Surprisingly, the report shows that monthly welcome mailings actually outperform weekly welcomes when it comes to total clicks and revenue per email. In the area of total clicks, monthly mailings even outperform daily bulk mailings.

I would be interested to know more about what makes a welcome email following a one-week layoff less enticing than one following a four-week layoff. Are there any consumer psychologists out there who can hazard a guess?

To learn everything you’ve ever wanted to know about welcome emails, download The welcome email report: Benchmark data and analysis for engaging new subscribers through email marketing now.


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