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Understanding Validation Samples Within Model Development

An introduction to the different types of validation samples

Model validation is an essential step in evaluating and verifying a model’s performance during development before finalizing the design and proceeding with implementation. More specifically, during a predictive model’s development, the objective of a model validation is to measure the model’s accuracy in predicting the expected outcome. For a credit risk model, this may be predicting the likelihood of good or bad payment behavior, depending on the predefined outcome. Two general types of data samples can be used to complete a model validation. The first is known as the in-time, or holdout, validation sample and the second is known as the out-of-time validation sample.

So, what’s the difference between an in-time and an out-of-time validation sample? An in-time validation sample sets aside part of the total sample made available for the model development. Random partitioning of the total sample is completed upfront, generally separating the data into a portion used for development and the remaining portion used for validation. For instance, the data may be randomly split, with 70 percent used for development and the other 30 percent used for validation. Other common data subset schemes include an 80/20, a 60/40 or even a 50/50 partitioning of the data, depending on the quantity of records available within each segment of your performance definition. Before selecting a data subset scheme to be used for model development, you should evaluate the number of records available in your target performance group, such as number of bad accounts. If you have too few records in your target performance group, a 50/50 split can leave you with insufficient performance data for use during model development. A separate blog post will present a few common options for creating alternative validation samples through a technique known as resampling.

Once the data has been partitioned, the model is created using the development sample. The model is then applied to the holdout validation sample to determine the model’s predictive accuracy on data that wasn’t used to develop the model. The model’s predictive strength and accuracy can be measured in various ways by comparing the known and predefined performance outcome to the model’s predicted performance outcome.

The out-of-time validation sample contains data from an entirely different time period or customer campaign than what was used for model development. Validating model performance on a different time period is beneficial to further evaluate the model’s robustness. Selecting a data sample from a more recent time period having a fully mature set of performance data allows the modeler to evaluate model performance on a data set that may more closely align with the current environment in which the model will be used. In this case, a more recent time period can be used to establish expectations and set baseline parameters for model performance, such as population stability indices and performance monitoring.

Learn more about how Experian Decision Analytics can help you with your custom model development needs.