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How Day 1 Certainty improves the mortgage journey

 

The journey to a mortgage is complex and expensive, so of course the transaction will require more than a few swipes on a smartphone. The U.S. existing home median sales price in October was $274,000 – not cheap. Still, with advancements in digital verification, lenders can dramatically accelerate the process, providing benefits to both their own operations and the consumer mortgage experience.

Underwriting a sizeable loan can take weeks with the task of collecting income and asset documents to analyze and verify. In fact, one source from the Mortgage Bankers Association says the average mortgage application has ballooned to 500 pages.

The consumer is typically asked to find, print and scan papers revealing insights around employment status and wages, bank and retirement accounts, debts and beyond. The good news is that this process can be handled digitally, and I’m not talking about simply scanning and emailing. Verification solutions exist to enable consumers to grant limited and secure access to digitally verify assets and income.

As lenders evaluate verification solutions, one of the key differentiators to seek is Fannie Mae Day 1 Certainty, which claims to slash the average cycle time for income validation by 8.1 days, employment validation by 11.9 days, and asset validation by 6.1 days. *

Fannie Mae features a list of approved vendors who provide Fannie Mae-approved verification reports. This group of authorized suppliers receive freedom from representations and warranties for more efficient risk management, and additionally receive the benefit of a more streamlined process through Fannie Mae’s Desktop Underwriter® (DU®).

DU’s latest enhancement leverages a verification of asset report derived from aggregated bank account data, something Finicity (an Experian partner) is approved to utilize. Building on Day 1 Certainty, Finicity is participating in a new single source pilot with Fannie Mae to validate income, assets and employment.

While it will take time for lenders to embrace this new technology – and consumers will need to feel comfortable granting the digital access and understanding how the process works – the thought is the mortgage journey will become faster and offer an optimized borrower experience.

Like so many other aspects in our lives, mortgage is bound to go digital.

*Average days saved reflects data captured between January 2017 and June 2017.